Check out this week’s new releases here: http://bit.ly/2aZZX6Y

DCR

Article by Gregg Katzman

DC Rebirth has done an amazing job re-energizing my interest in the publisher’s fictional universe. The DC Rebirth Special was a brilliant way to begin the new direction and it’s so obvious that DC has a clear focus with each of these titles: celebrate what people love about these characters and teams. Go back to the basics, and then do something fresh with it. Don’t change things just for the sake of changing them. Instead, embrace the positive and run with it! So far, each and every title has managed to capture my interest; some more than others, obviously, but the fact that all of the titles have me wanting to see more proves that the publisher really has given this new direction everything they’ve got. Okay, I could go on and on about why I think DC Rebirth is a step in the right direction (you can read a coworker’s editorial about that here), but that’s not why you’re here. You’re here because you want to see what DC has to offer on this week’s new comic book day! So grab a drink, get comfortable, and prepare to get excited for brand new DC Rebirth issues!

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DC Looney Tunes Variant Covers Midtown Comics

If you thought DC’s super-powered team-ups couldn’t get any crazier, think again.  Introducing DC’s new line of Looney Tunes variant covers coming this November!  At this point you might be asking yourself, what can be expected from this new lineup?  Well, DC’s greatest heroes now find themselves teaming up with characters such as Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Tweety, Porky Pig, and the rest of the Looney Tunes gang.  To help you get acquainted with all of these new covers, we have created another one of our handy cover guides, Looney Tunes style!

Check out the beefy list that follows and be sure to post your thoughts on these crazy new covers in the comments section below.  Please enjoy the read!

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By Jacobus Dixon

Superheroes and costumed vigilantes were the bread and butter of the comic book magazine industry. They were colorful he-men who took no guff from nobody but ddidn’tuse their abilities to abuse innocent people. They were like local sports stars everybody would cheer for. But as a group, they weren’t very diverse. Their costumes were different, but underneath they were all just a bunch of muscle-bound, wealthy white guys. This was the group that had the money, so popular art and commercial products were primarily aimed at pleasing them above everyone else (unfortunately this is still true for some products).  And if you weren’t one of these wealthy white guys, these products would make you want to adjust your aesthetic tastes to be accepted into their sphere of influence. However, some felt that this pandering was a little too exclusive. William Moulton Marston was one of those people.

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Detective Comics #31

By Jacobus Dixon

It’s late 1939, we’re coming out of the Great Depression, World War II has started everywhere except the U.S., Gone with the Wind is the motion picture everyone’s talking about, the New York World’s Fair has opened, and Superman is dominating comic book magazine sales. A close second of course, was Batman (originally Bat-Man, but I guess National Comics figured the hyphen cut in on the name’s appeal). Unlike Superman, Batman was not super-powered and relied on his athletic abilities, gadgets, spooky appearance, and sheer determination to get him out of a jam.  But he wasn’t the only popular character to have these traits.

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Superman #1

By Jacobus Dixon

Now what’s better than one story starring Superman? Try four. And that’s exactly what readers got with Superman #1 in June 1939. Ever since he exploded onto the newsstand scene in 1938, Superman was a big seller, and giving the guy his own book was the best way to honor that achievement. As great as his appearances were in Action Comics, fans just couldn’t wait a whole season for only one Superman story. So National gave their readers what they wanted: more Superman!

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