We welcome Batman and Wytches writer and friend of Midtown Comics Scott Snyder to the show!  He tells us how he is trying to frighten us with Wytches, blow our minds with Batman’s Endgame, all while trying to save us some money!

Sam, Gavin, Dimitros, Andrew, and Ted also talk about Gotham and what they think of it so far, then Sam and Dimitrios give us updates on some projects they’re working on. We also run through our top picks of the week and what we’re looking forward to next week!

If you have questions or suggestions for the show please let us know on our Facebook, Twitter and email podcast@midtowncomics.com.  Leave us a voicemail at 980 MID-TOWN and we’ll play it on a future podcast!

Also visit midtowncomics.com for all the comics we talked about plus much more and have them delivered right to your door!

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FunComics

By Jacobus Dixon

Throughout mythology you have these basic archetypes that define a culture’s heroes. Whether it’s with incredible strength, quick wits, or nimble swiftness, these characters use these talents to maintain an idealized status quo. However, there’s another class of hero whose habits dangerously border on being something not so much admired and awed…but feared. The Spectre is one of those heroes.

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Batman

By Jacobus Dixon

While he still had a little ways to go in terms of reaching Superman levels of fame, Batman was still a pretty big hit for National Comics. But with the addition of Robin, that popularity doubled to the point where National thought it would be a good idea to give him his own title. Even with characters like Superman, there was always a little trepidation on giving a character their own magazine. Mostly because there was always the question of: “well, yeah…People like their individual stories, but will they read four consecutive stories with that character?” So far, Superman’s appearances in two magazines hadn’t hurt his image. But Batman wasn’t Superman…

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Selfie Covers

Remember last month’s DC Bombshells Covers Guide?  Well, DC is currently releasing an army of selfie covers for its characters!  Read on for the complete guide and release dates of these wacky fun-filled selfie variants! Read the rest of this entry »

By Jacobus Dixon

With the arrival of Whiz Comics #2 (later renumbered to #1) and Captain Marvel, National Comics had some true competition against Superman, their star seller. What tipped the balance was a demographic that neither National Comics nor Fawcett Publications really paid much heed to, children. Ever since their onset, comic book magazines were really meant to be an all-ages form of entertainment. And all ages did indeed read them. From Little Lulu to Tarzan to Gasoline Alley, readers from a variety of demographics would indulge in the books to get some disposable entertainment while on the go or whenever they had a little downtime. As long as there was a demand for the comics, the publishers were happy to print them. As long as the profits came in, who cared who was paying for them? Although Captain Marvel was definitely not the first comic to feature a series based around a child or children, it combined the sensibilities of those previous comics with that of the superhero genre, and as a result swayed many children away from Superman to Captain Marvel.

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By Jacobus Dixon

By 1940, National Comics was sitting pretty. And why shouldn’t they have been? Superman and Batman were the highest selling comic-magazine characters, and they were both National’s. Superman alone was a sales powerhouse that just kept on chugging (they did say he was more powerful than a locomotive). He was the highlight of Action Comics, he had his own magazine, he had a newspaper strip (not actually published by National, but hey…market recognition), and an upcoming radio show to boot. The only real competition to Superman was the growing popularity of Batman, but since he was a National character too, it really didn’t count as competition. Timely had a niche audience with Namor the Sub-Mariner and the Human Torch, but not enough sales to really threaten Superman. Yes, other companies thought to churn out doppelgangers to the Man of Tomorrow (Superman’s first nickname for you kids out there). But none of them really stuck, due in part to National’s quick litigation team and just simply unappealing character designs that left readers with a “meh” sensibility. That is…until Captain Marvel came around in February of 1940.

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