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NOW AVAILABLE! Midtown Comics is importing a limited quantity of these life size Captain America shields, produced for the Asian market by King-Arts International. Add these deluxe shields to your Steve Rogers collection today! Order online today, or pick up in store! All stores will have the classic shield in stock, but you can special order any of the additional shields online or directly at our stores! More info below: 

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Midtown Comics is open on Memorial day!
Monday, May 25th, we invite you to join us for our annual Memorial Day sale, and save 20% OFF EVERYTHING, all day long, in-store only! All three of our NYC stores will be open! Browse our wide selection of comic books, action figures, collectibles, and more! Get in the holiday spirit and pick up some Iron Patriot or Captain America comics! Check out our store hours below!

Times Square: 8:00AM to 12midnight
Grand Central: 11:00AM to 9:00PM
Downtown: 10:00AM to 8:00PM

Disclaimer: All sales and special offers advertised herein are valid in-store only, Monday, May 25th only, and does not apply to convention tickets, gift cards, or advance orders, and cannot be combined with any other offer, and other exclusions may apply. NO COUPON REQUIRED. Not valid at TRU or FAO.”

GOT

By Dimitrios Fragiskatos and Colleen Cleary

One of the most celebrated fantasy universes is mired with antiheroes, good not getting rewarded, death, betrayal and incest, and then there’s Westeros.

A fun game to play is what would this person do in that situation? Dimitrios and Colleen will play this game for you with Marvel Characters in the Game of Thrones Universe.

Read on for our complete list below!

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By Jacobus Dixon

It was bad enough having to contend with Captain Marvel, but now Superman-DC (the nickname given to comics from National Allied Publications and Detective Comics Inc. as they unofficially merged) had to deal with Captain America as well. One was a living childhood fantasy; the other was a super-idealized form of what happens when you mix nationalism and super heroics. Yeah, Superman’s great, but he’s a grown up while Captain Marvel is actually still a kid doing amazing things. And it’s fun watching Batman and Robin take on the Joker with nothing but their manpower and wits, but Captain America is fighting the real threat of German spies. While both Batman and Superman are certainly not devoid of neither childhood fantasy nor real world danger (or at least as real as it gets in terms of comic book writing), those subjects did not feature as strongly in their stories. So how did they contend with characters that used them as a solid foundation?

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By Michael Kim

 Hello sports and comic book fans, this is Michael from the back issue department for this installment on the national pastime and the First Avenger.  With the Major League Baseball (MLB) postseason in full swing, the 2014 season is drawing to a close.  For one player, his season and career has ended: New York Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter.  Jeter, along with MLB, has said their goodbyes and thanks.  The thought came to mind to thank Jeter the comic book way.  If the 11th Captain in NY Yankees history Derek Jeter were a comic book character, he would be Captain America, Steven Rogers.

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By Jacobus Dixon

By the early 1940s, American readers were enjoying the exploits of their favorite funny book characters, while Europeans and Asians were a bit preoccupied with staying alive while World War II blasted all around them. That didn’t mean Americans weren’t aware of what was happening. Adolf Hitler, Emperor Hirohito, and Benito Mussolini worked very hard to earn their way onto many American’s most hated lists. Of the three, Hitler really made the strongest impression with his hate-driven tirades and the lethal German war machine that could make his Nazi dreams a reality. So naturally, most American politicians, military personnel, and civilians considered him the greatest threat (even though the Japanese proved time and again that they too were deadly with their military). Hitler and his Nazi party were staunch believers in Aryan superiority and that all lesser races needed to be removed from the world. And while the U.S. was known for being pretty racist itself, this terminology was a little extreme (even for American standards, which is pretty bad). The ones who got sore the most were the Americans of Jewish descent (many of whom came from families that had just emigrated from Europe or had come from there themselves). In particular were a couple of Jewish-American artists named Hymie Simon and Jacob Kurtzberg (or as they’re better known as: Joe Simon and Jack Kirby).  And they were just itching to let Hitler know what they and many other Americans thought of him. Read the rest of this entry »