By Andrew Cohen

Where do we even begin? Like always, we had a blast at this year’s New York Comic Con 2014! Our Midtown Comics booth #2036 was constantly packed all weekend long with comic book fans of all ages—some new faces and some familiar faces as well! We also had the chance to interview some awesome cosplayers, some old friends of Midtown, and some Zombie crawlers! Read on for exclusive coverage of this year’s NYCC 2014!

Read the rest of this entry »

HCF Banner

Welcome to Halloween ComicFest 2014, with some special thrills and chills from your frightful friends at Midtown Comics! On Saturday, October 25th, we’ll offer spook-tacular titles for kids of all ages, absolutely FREE! You don’t actually have to be a kid to partake! Click through for more details and the full list of Halloween ComicFest 2014 titles! Trick or treat!

Read the rest of this entry »

By Jacobus Dixon

By the early 1940s, American readers were enjoying the exploits of their favorite funny book characters, while Europeans and Asians were a bit preoccupied with staying alive while World War II blasted all around them. That didn’t mean Americans weren’t aware of what was happening. Adolf Hitler, Emperor Hirohito, and Benito Mussolini worked very hard to earn their way onto many American’s most hated lists. Of the three, Hitler really made the strongest impression with his hate-driven tirades and the lethal German war machine that could make his Nazi dreams a reality. So naturally, most American politicians, military personnel, and civilians considered him the greatest threat (even though the Japanese proved time and again that they too were deadly with their military). Hitler and his Nazi party were staunch believers in Aryan superiority and that all lesser races needed to be removed from the world. And while the U.S. was known for being pretty racist itself, this terminology was a little extreme (even for American standards, which is pretty bad). The ones who got sore the most were the Americans of Jewish descent (many of whom came from families that had just emigrated from Europe or had come from there themselves). In particular were a couple of Jewish-American artists named Hymie Simon and Jacob Kurtzberg (or as they’re better known as: Joe Simon and Jack Kirby).  And they were just itching to let Hitler know what they and many other Americans thought of him. Read the rest of this entry »

Black magic, violence, ominous woods, and centuries of dark secrets welcome to Wytches, the highly anticipated horror series from acclaimed writer Scott Snyder (Batman, Superman Unchained) and artist Jock (Savage Wolverine, The Losers). First announced at the Image Expo in January 2014, Wytches sets a new tone for horror comics, bringing the reader back to a primal sense of fear, something we can all relate to.

Read the rest of this entry »

By Jacobus Dixon

By the winter of 1940, superheroes were causing funny book magazines to just fly off the newsstands. They were an odd blend or mythology and athleticism wrapped in a brilliant package of primary colors. They often lived fulfilling lives as prosperous or wealthy men, but men still hungry for adventure. And almost all of their adventures involved finding the source of their problems and delivering a killer knockout blow to them. It was like watching a sports event with higher stakes and a team that you knew would win, but not how. And even though the hero’s tactics to triumph were often completely exaggerated and unrealistic, it didn’t matter! That was part of the fun. It would have been like saying Popeye was terrible because he misrepresents what spinach can do for you. But people didn’t read Popeye comic strips and watch Popeye cartoons because they wanted to see the effects of spinach on human physiology, nor did they read superhero comics for real solutions to the financial inequities of the Depression and American life in general. They wanted to be entertained, and seeing a colorfully clad athlete sock a local street tough or thieving businessman was just what they were looking for.  But what was the next step? How do you keep these characters from going stale? Well…grouping them together to form some kind of team seemed like a good idea. And that’s exactly what All-American Publications did.

Read the rest of this entry »

By Jacobus Dixon

Although All-Star Publications wasn’t in a complete rivalry with National Allied Publications or Detective Comics Inc. (due to the fact that they were all owned by Harry Donenfeld) they still didn’t want to sit out on the superhero craze that was transforming the publishing industry.  They had some success with the Flash, Hawkman, and Johnny Thunder in Flash Comics. And naturally that taste of success led them to produce more superheroes. The spooky Spectre had promise, but he may have been a little too supernatural to attract more average readers. While most superheroes were defined by their phenomenal abilities, it was that human appearance that made them so appealing to readers. So you didn’t want to step too far away from that (at least not in the late 1930s/early 1940s) if you wanted your character to be successful. People do like supernatural stories though, so where do you strike the balance?

Read the rest of this entry »