By Jacobus Dixon

By the early 1980s, Hollywood was beginning to notice more and more how summer blockbusters and franchise films kept their wallets full. Movies like Jaws, Star Wars, Rocky, and Superman just raked in the dough, so naturally there were sequels planned to recapture the magic. This was especially good for the Superman franchise because director Richard Donner had opted to shoot the original and the sequel back-to-back (good thing the first movie was a hit, or that just would have been awkward). Apparently people liked the idea of seeing a superhero as an actual action/adventure character and not just campy comedy. Christopher Reeve gave a Superman performance that was so three-dimensional and human, it made us remember why we fell in love with the character in the first place (and also why so many still think of him as their favorite Superman).  By the time Superman: The Movie was released in 1978, about 75% of Superman II was shot and completed. With Donner behind the camera, and Reeve in the tights it wouldn’t be long before we got our amazing sequel starring the Man of Steel.

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By Jaccobus Dixon 

Why did people bother with Superman? He was an old-fashioned, goody-two-shoes with the personality of sliced bread. Sure, George Reeves made him popular in The Adventures of Superman, but that was during 1950s America. This was 1978. Why should a major film studio like Warner Brothers waste their time with a children’s icon that was starting to become too square even for them? Well…he inspired hope during a period that wasn’t very hopeful (the Depression). And, let’s be honest, things weren’t looking too great in 1978 either. A ton of resources were wasted on a war that was both unnecessary and unpopular (Vietnam), the Watergate scandal shook the confidence people had in their politicians, the economy was dipping hard, and of course there was the possibility of a nuclear showdown with the USSR just to make things worse. If people ever needed a good escapist fantasy, this was a good time.

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Superman Comics

By Jacobus Dixon

If you love comic books, then there’s a pretty good chance that you like movies as well. So isn’t it great when the powers that be decide to put the time, money, and effort into a motion picture that gives these characters a chance to jump off the page? Well…it can be when it’s done right. But while movies and comics are very similar, they do have their differences. With illustration, the only thing that can hamper the artist is a lack of imagination and/or a decent hard surface to draw on with good light. With cinema, you’ve got all these different lights, sets, props, actors, sound technicians, visual effects technicians, assistants, studio hands…woof, it’s a lot. And what’s happening is that you have this virtual army of people bringing to life something that took maybe one or two guys to create. So to say that things get messy is a bit of an understatement. Fortunately though, there are times when the planets align, and this army is able to adapt a piece just beautifully. But…like I said, it’s once in a blue moon.

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Superman #1

By Jacobus Dixon

Now what’s better than one story starring Superman? Try four. And that’s exactly what readers got with Superman #1 in June 1939. Ever since he exploded onto the newsstand scene in 1938, Superman was a big seller, and giving the guy his own book was the best way to honor that achievement. As great as his appearances were in Action Comics, fans just couldn’t wait a whole season for only one Superman story. So National gave their readers what they wanted: more Superman!

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In honor of John Romita, Jr.’s first-ever work for DC Comics on Superman #32, Midtown Comics is excited to announce a signing at our Downtown location on Thursday, July 17th!

Superman #32
Writer: Geoff Johns • Artist: John Romita, Jr., Klaus Janson

“THE MAN OF TOMORROW” chapter 1! A NEW ERA for SUPERMAN begins as Geoff Johns takes the reigns – and he’s joined by the legendary super-talent of John Romita, Jr. in his first-ever work for DC Comics as they introduce Ulysses, the Man of Tomorrow, into the Man of Steel’s life. This strange visitor shares many of Kal-El’s experiences, including having been rocketed from a world with no future. Prepare yourself for a run full of new heroes, new villains and new mysteries! Plus, Perry White offers Clark a chance to return to The Daily Planet!

This issue is also offered as a combo pack edition with a redemption code for a digital download of this issue.

Combo pack edition: $4.99 US

Midtown Comics will also be selling a number of incentive covers on the day of the signing!